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Ed Talks | Jennifer Holme | Housing Affordability

Housing costs have risen dramatically and this rise is especially problematic for parents. In this talk, Jennifer Jellison Holme reviews recent data on housing affordability and considers the implications of data for parents and caregivers with children.

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Each year, nearly 7.5 million students are chronically absent – missing 10% or more of the school year. How should researchers, policymakers, and educators address chronic absenteeism and its effects on students? 

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Housing costs have risen dramatically and this rise is especially problematic for parents. In this talk, Jennifer Jellison Holme reviews recent data on housing affordability and considers the implications of data for parents and caregivers with children.

Each year, nearly 7.5 million students are chronically absent – missing 10% or more of the school year. How should researchers, policymakers, and educators address chronic absenteeism and its effects on students? 

Rooted in indigenous traditions, restorative practices are a humanizing approach toward education.

“In the current climate, it is imperative now more than ever that psychological research is utilized to help communities of color address these current issues related to immigration and the increase of racial tensions,” said Professor Kevin Cokley,

Associate Professor Liliana Garces examines how bans on race-conscious admissions policies are diminishing the proportion of students of color who are enrolling in medical schools, thus exacerbating current racial and ethnic health disparities.

Curriculum and Instruction Associate Professor Allison Skerrett has been a part of the International Council of Education Advisors in Scotland since 2016. Skerrett discusses how this experience has impacted her research and its potential to impact education in Scotland and the world.

This talk examines the nature of racial inequality in schooling, and through drawing on findings from multiple empirical studies, argues that we can and must find ways to provide equitable access to high-quality instruction, using STEM as an example, both within and across schools and districts.

Victor Sáenz began his tenure as chair of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy in June. He discusses how changing the department’s name from Educational Administration better reflects the dynamic field, and what’s happening within the department and in the educational leadership and policy arena.

"A Hauntology on Data: Diffracting Specters of Racialization Toward an Autopoietic Turn/Overturn" As Avery Gordon (1997) reminds us, there are already ghosts or hauntings in the seemingly present; what might be understood as an absence of presence, and a complex history and subjectivities. Indeed, the haunting demands sociopolitical significance as Derrida

Many postsecondary institutions respond to a legal and policy environment that seeks to end the consideration of race in education policies by adopting race-neutral policies and practices in admissions. Meanwhile institutions have remained publicly committed to racial and ethnic diversity and to promoting inclusive learning environments.

As we close out Black History Month, it’s an important opportunity to take a look at examples of the work our faculty have done to expand research and support the success of African American students at all grade levels.

Join Educational Psychology Associate Professor Germine Awad as she discusses both the ramifications of classifying people of Middle Eastern or North African (MENA) descent as white on the U.S. Census form

Join Educational Policy and Planning Assistant Professor Joshua Childs as he discusses chronic absenteeism, a K-12 problem hidden in plain sight. Childs illuminates four zones that affect students’ lives and school attendance and shares what educators can do to address the problems that impact school attendance.

Melissa Wetzel, associate professor of language and literacy, shares research-based ideas about the literacy “crisis” and how understanding diverse literacies is a stronger educational approach.

Her research explores the relationship between education, policy, and equality of opportunity. It centers on three related policy strands: the racial politics of public education, the politics of school choice, marketization and privatization, and the role of elite and community-based advocacy in shaping public education.

In “Bridging the Political Divide: Educators on the Front Line," Soto spoke directly to over 100 educators in attendance about how what happens in their classrooms can help bridge a widening political and societal divide.

Jennifer Keys Adair, Ph,D., is an Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education at The University of Texas at Austin. Adair works with parents, teachers, administrators and young children to offer more dynamic and sophisticated learning experiences to children from resilient, marginalized communities in the US and globally. Her areas of

The Ethnic Studies Agenda in Texas: Implications for Teacher Recruitment and Preparation

Recent research has found that students who participate in ethnic studies classes show improved academic performance and a higher attendance rate. Students benefit from seeing their culture and ethnic backgrounds represented in the classroom, and studies suggest that the relevant subject matter encourages students to be more engaged in the

Huriya Jabbar examines the influence of market forces on the nation's charter school environment.

Adolescents are a sleep-deprived group, with an estimated 87% of high schoolers getting insufficient sleep on school nights and 40% reporting six or fewer hours. This "teen sleep crisis" is believed to have many causes,

As a student Gilma Sanchez and her family faced traumatic hardships that went unnoticed by teachers. Now an elementary school principal, she prioritizes nurturing the whole student.

Student Alyssa Mayleen Mermea combines new interests with long-standing ones and earns a Washington, D.C., internship.

Dr. John Bartholomew discusses how his department aims to improve public health through research and practice.

Alumnus and Austin ISD Superintendent Cruz shares insights on key attributes of leadership.

Ph.D. student Anthony LeClair reflects on his summer internship at the U.S. Department of Education.

Three professors share how they challenge and prepare students to think about leadership in education—from early childhood on up.

UT College of Education’s Superintendency Program attracts and prepares education leaders of the future, like Houston Independent School District’s Rick Cruz.

Summer School for Ph.D. Students

How Mentoring Strengthens Latino Communities and Classrooms

Mentoring partnerships support preservice and current educators.

[caption id="attachment_1666" align="alignright" width="240"] Anna Drake and Dean Justiz[/caption] What is a mentor? Academic literature tells us that a mentor is an experienced individual who provides ongoing upward support and mobility to a protégé’s career (Hunt & Michael, 1983; Kram, 1983; Ragins & Cotton, 1999). But doesn’t that sound a little sterile?

February 11, 2015 Teachers are leaving their jobs in record numbers. To find out why, studies have focused on how structural factors, like the type of school in which a teacher works, contribute to job dissatisfaction. But University of Texas at Austin educational psychologist Christopher McCarthy recently conducted a survey of